Automation Transition Path

With ships being designed to operate at least for 30 years, it is inevitable that the onboard systems will eventually need to be replaced either due to errors or because they have become obsolete and new equipment will have to be installed. The concept of Maritime 4.0 and the strict regulations imposed by the IMO for the required energy efficiency and emissions control for sea vessels demand that ships be designed keeping both robustness and adaptability in mind. In other words, new marine vessel designs need to take into account uncertain future modifications in order to stay competitive. However, no one can guarantee that the new or replaced subsystems will be compatible and work seamlessly as part of the greater integrated ship automation system. Τhis work package actually focuses on the aforementioned automation transition path that the ships will undergo in the years to come.

In particular, the aim is to construct scalable and modular system control architectures, which allow for extensions and exchanges of sub-systems over the vessel's lifetime without compromising system stability as well as robust systems that properly diagnose faults and take remedial actions by prioritizing the overall safety.

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Nikos Kougiatsos, MSc

TU Delft

Faculty 3mE, Department of Maritime and Transport Technology, Section of Transport Engineering and Logistics

E N.Kougiatsos@tudelft.nl

Prof. Dr. Rudy R. Negenborn

TU Delft

Faculty 3mE, Department of Maritime and Transport Technology, Section of Transport Engineering and Logistics

E R.R.Negenborn@tudelft.nl

Dr. Vasso Reppa

TU Delft

Faculty 3mE, Department of Maritime and Transport Technology, Section of Transport Engineering and Logistics

E V.Reppa@tudelft.nl